Word from the Dark Side – the dragon wakes, teambuilding mistakes, rural population breaks and Rolex headaches

Mama Luba by Serebro, 2011. HT commenter PrinzEugen from this post

Pulling apart a Salon agitprop piece about the Ukraine war:

Russia has lots of heavy bombers. Where are they? Also, didn’t the Jewish Comedian just recently fire half his command staff? I know they just deployed the closest thing we will ever see to the literal 45th Mechanized Hairdresser Battalion — those snazzy unicorn patches must really be bucking up the guys at the front — but… you know.

Waking the dragon:

There was a time when the United States had such overwhelming military superiority that American leaders could say and do whatever they liked without concern about what leaders of other nations thought or would do.  That time is gone.

Bear in mind that while the U.S. military sought full spectrum dominance everywhere in everything, the Chinese military has been working on the one very specific problem of how to counter U.S. power in the China seas.  (And the Russian military has spent at least 15 years working on the one very specific problem of how to counter U.S. power in Eastern Europe).

President Theodore Roosevelt liked to quote the alleged African proverb, “Speak softly and carry a big stick.”  The most dangerous thing that an individual person or a national leader can do is to make idle threats.  That’s what our leaders have fallen into the habit of doing.

Do you ever wonder if normal Jews notice and get bothered by the small number of Jews who stoke division out of historical, anti-Western grievance? Sometimes they do:

Shame on Rubenstein for disrespecting the country that has offered us so many opportunities, and has served as a beacon of hope to the world. Shame on Rubenstein for perpetuating the nastiest stereotypes about Jews, and feeding the hatred against us.

I’m not normally interested in AFL news but this was an interesting saga

In Australia, the new Labor government plans on holding a referendum to add an Indigenous Voice to Parliament in the Constitution. However, they will only announce what form that will take after the referendum. The thinking is that division over the details may cause the referendum to fail, as happened in the referendum to make Australia a republic in 1999.

This was explicitly stated in earlier news reports but those have now disappeared as even correct-thinking Age readers agreed it was a bit much.

The Prime Minister has since backed down.

Referenda are extremely difficult to pass in Australia because they require a majority of people overall and a majority of states. There are six states and three of them vote ‘no’ to just about everything.

Napoleon’s village:

In the village where I am staying there lives a madman. He was born on the 5th of May which is also the birthday of Napoleon. For this reason he has become the little French general, at least in his own damaged mind. Each morning he walks the streets of the small town in the early hours and he sings the French national anthem. During the parts where he does not know the words he reverts to numerous da-daas and ba-doms.

His song echoes among the narrow cobbled streets. The town rests length ways along a steep hill, so at times his voice rises from below while at other moments it settles down from above. His route varies from day to day, but after a half hour or so he is done and he returns to his home and what he does for the rest of his time I do not know. But to his fellow townspeople he is a part of their lives that they accept with affection.

If You Know So Damn Much, Why Did You Ask Me?

So, when you reach out for advice, free advice, at least consider what you are hearing. It may apply to you, it may not, but the reason you reached out is because whatever it is you are doing is not getting you what you want.

A recent article discussed how coping with a declining and aging population will be the main challenge this century. A signpost along the way: rural areas in Japan are becoming depopulated because local governments can no longer afford to clear snow or repair bridges:

In a nutshell, the national government was clearly in the process of making moves to abandon rural areas.

According to data from the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, some 647 of Japan’s towns and villages have been designated as “depopulated areas.” Collectively, these now account for some 60% of the nation’s land area, and rather than make efforts to revitalize these locales, government policy appears to be inclined to simply abandon them.

I reckon dying Japanese villages would be perfect for digital nomads. While more expensive than Chiang Mai, the cost of living there is lower than you might think, Wi-Fi and power are reliable, there’s plenty of fresh produce and the locations are beautiful. $50,000 p/a would allow a very comfortable lifestyle. Japan could arrange special visas for those who qualify and the newcomers would revitalize dying areas.

But that would require the type of thinking and decision-making that Japan is institutionally incapable of.

Saitama man’s ¥7 million Rolex stolen after leaving it alone with ‘potential buyer’ for two minutes:

On July 25, two men met in the parking lot of a convenience store in Saitama Prefecture to negotiate the sale of an 18-karat yellow gold Rolex Yacht-Master II. Despite its value, the seller was willing to part with it for just 6.3 million in a sale arranged through a second-hand online shopping site.

After the potential buyer walked up to the seller’s car wearing shorts, a T-shirt, and thick gloves, the buyer handed him the luxury timepiece for inspection. After looking at it for a bit, the buyer asked the seller to go into the store to buy some tea. The seller then made the fateful decision to go.

Nothing good ever happens in the carpark of a Saitama convenience store.

Ritzy Japanese cop breaks Rolex wristwatch during arrest, sends suspect US$6,000 repair bill

Back in November 2013, the police officer was investigating an incident in which a man had exposed himself to a high school girl in Hasuda City, Saitama Prefecture. The cop suddenly spotted the suspect who tried to get away in a car and pursued him by grabbing onto the car’s windshield wiper. After being dragged a good distance, he managed to stop the car and arrest the driver.

According to the lawsuit, the officer sustained significant physical injuries and is left with psychological scars from the wild chase and is asking for about 2,500,000 yen (roughly $21,000) from the suspect. And while suing a suspect for damages already shocked his fellow police officers, the cop further surprised his colleagues when he tacked on a 736,560 yen bill to fix the expensive Rolex watch he was wearing at the time.

That’s it.

5 comments

  1. Vizzini · August 7

    I reckon dying Japanese villages would be perfect for digital nomads. While more expensive than Chiang Mai, the cost of living there is lower than you might think, Wi-Fi and power are reliable, there’s plenty of fresh produce and the locations are beautiful. $50,000 p/a would allow a very comfortable lifestyle. Japan could arrange special visas for those who qualify and the newcomers would revitalize dying areas.

    But that would require the type of thinking and decision-making that Japan is institutionally incapable of.

    I understand and support Japanese opposition to this. Better to leave those areas unpopulated or underpopulated in the hope that they’ll be available for future, larger Japanese generations than to start inviting in lots of foreigners and realize in a couple generations that your country isn’t yours anymore.

    Liked by 3 people

    • lemmiwinks · August 8

      This is pretty much what Australia has done. But we got a world beating run of GDP!

      Like

  2. Kentucky Headhunter · August 7

    There’s seems to be a fairly common trope in anime these days about kids going to school in rural areas where there are maybe half a dozen or less (sometimes even just one) students of all ages being taught be a single teacher in a single classroom, in buildings that were obviously made to have at least a hundred or more kids.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. freemattpodcast · August 9

    Beware where you hang that poster!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. dickycone · August 10

    That marriagesexandmore post was really good. I’ve achieved a marriage and life similar to his, largely through asking myself why women are the way they are, what I really want, and how I might mostly likely get those things. Stumbling across Heartiste and PUA-era Roosh helped a lot, as did learning to believe in God again. That might seem like a contradiction, given that Heartiste was an obvious unrepentant sinner and Roosh himself turned strongly against “game” when he became a believer, but “game” and an understanding of women’s true nature can be used both for good or for evil.

    Like

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