Word from the Dark Side – long knives, let the lady play, loser’s lack of leniency and let them eat plastic

Big Tech’s Night of the Long Knives:

The Internet giants are only the vanguard. In the meantime, the banks are already beginning to strike powerfully (Deutsche Bank wants to cancel all business relations with Trump). Those who don’t follow suit will only get an account in an obscure regional bank in ‘Hungary’s Pampas,’ and the transfer costs will eat away most of the income. And if all the dissidents have been driven into Bitcoin, how long will Bitcoin be around? As a ‘maledict’, one who can no longer get jobs or work for political reasons, what are you left with? Molotov cocktail or collecting bottles? Are these the alternatives?

Related: Big Tech has no power at all?

So the victim creates the bully. The fact that Facebook can be bullied makes people—both journalists and their readers—want to bully Facebook. Facebook’s power leak produces a kind of oasis of power—water in the desert. The water causes the palm trees; the palm trees don’t cause the water.

Facebook was not designed to be a device for managing the minds of billions of people. But as that ape-man in 2001 taught us—if anything is a weapon, some ass-bandit will eventually figure out how to use it as a weapon.

See Luisman’s response (in English) in the replies to his original article in German.

My three thoughts on the issue:

  1. Contra Yarvin, there is some ‘democratic’ power over the Big Techs in terms of (a) Twitter mobs and (b) a user base that chooses to participate, and which might not.
  2. Zuck and Jack look a bit scared to me. Just my imagination? What do others think? My suspicion, based on very little, is that they are more reasonable than they appear and would rather not do this bullshit. However, as Luisman points out, they could just quit and spend the rest of their lives in obscene luxury. I’ve always wondered why so few rich men do that. Not just ones mobbed by SJWs – I don’t understand why any man with more than $5M or so would spend another stressful day in the office. Something drives them aside from money. If not power, what?
  3. Keep working on your antifragility.

As for me, some time ago I requested tech bro advice for this blog. After long consideration, I decided not to move. I’m curious to see if WP would really ban a site as moderate and kind-hearted as this one.

Part of being antifragile is being Zen about the future.

Thanks to your advice, I’ve figured out how to back up my material on a private mirror site and I’ve also preserved my best stuff in a book that’s almost free.

I’ve joined the frozen ghost town of Gab, @nvladivostok1. For now I’ll follow back anyone no matter how nuts you are. Changed to Brave browser (it’s fast as!). May try Telegram after I sort a burner phone number.

Update: Didact has some further advice for avoiding big Tech that I’m going to think about.

The internet now feels like being a teenager in 1994 where you can’t have a private conversation because you have to use the single landline in the living room and your parents sitting there watching Heartbeat will give you a dark look if your language creeps beyond PG13.

I don’t want to plot evil or encourage hatred. I just want to talk shit with my mates and have a laugh without Ashlee from HR breathing down my neck.

Like this: Bill tells us about a woman who is not allowed to play elite, women’s Australian rules football.

That’s the sort of thing we need to go onto the Dark Web to giggle about nowadays.

The following, however, is fine to say anywhere you want: Trump failed us all. As usual Ann goes to absurd extremes because she’s got to attract attention and sell books, but there is an unwelcome grain of truth there.

Watch me lose some followers: Trump did subtly encourage some of his dumber followers to take extreme action, or at the least he took too long to call them off, hoping vaguely they had a plan. Then when they failed because they assumed he had a plan, Trump threw them under the bus.

It’s disappointing. No, it’s not disappointing. Disappointment presupposes high expectations, but I already assumed something like this would happen and said so on these very pages:

There’s some larping how angry people are and who’s going to do what. Fedposting’s getting out of control.

Protest if you like, but keep in mind: what did Trump do for Julian Assange, who leaked the Dem emails? What did he do for James Fields, who was railroaded when he probably should have been done for manslaughter?

What did Trump do for the gun-waving couple in St. Louis? What did he do for Kyle Rittenhouse?

What will he do for you?

Still, things went even worse than I assumed.

Trump could have gone out in a blaze of glory. With a more organized legal strategy he might have caught out a few more election cheats. While this would not have overturned the result, it may have embarrassed future administrations to improve the broken electoral system.

He might have declassified Deep State shenanigans. He might have pardoned Assange, Snowden and others. He might have poured scorn upon Republican Inc. and successfully campaigned against them in Georgia, forcing the party to realize it could no longer treat its core voters with contempt.

He might have urged young, patriotic Americans not to join the armed forces to avoid future Stupid Wars. He might have joined alternative media platforms and published such statements there as the MSM could not afford to ignore.

He might have recognized Taiwan, forcing China Joe to reverse the position soon after taking office.

Sad!

Instead he gave medals to golfers and appointed an envoy to tell foreigners off for being antiSemitic.

Part of me is glad the Trump Train has crashed and burned. While in office he projected an illusion that the system could be reformed. It can not. The sooner dissidents accept this, the sooner they can withdraw from public participation and start arranging their own lives.

There are some who will claim this is a black pill:

So relax. There is no reason, none whatsoever, to believe things aren’t proceeding precisely as they are supposed to proceed. The double envelopment is taking place. The enemy legions are trapped and helpless. I won’t even think about worrying until 48 hours AFTER someone else is sworn in as POTUS. I am, quite frankly, more than a little excited to watch it all unfold. This is the sort of history about which we have only hitherto been able to read.

Imagine Romans as the Visigoths were about to storm in. ‘Trust the plan. Honorius will have something up his sleeve.’ The black pillers who found a crafty hiding spot for three day did better.

It was hilarious to see the horned man in the Capitol, though I doubt he intended this as a classical reference.*

Face facts: the American Empire is in decline and there’s nothing you can do about it. I say this as a barbarian subject of the Empire myself.

You can call this a black pill if you like, but there’s no reason to give up hope for yourself and your family. It’s a wide world, there are plenty of opportunities; no invaders are coming to haul to into slavery. Rather, the West from now on will likely be less prosperous, capable and free. It’s unfortunate but it’s not the end of the world.

In other happenings, here is the most fertile woman in the world.

This is another long article and quite interesting: a Marxist critique of Woke. The professional-managerial class, according to classical materialism, cannot really champion the working class. It champions instead its own interests, trying to bribe the proletariat in order to gain their votes. Slightly edited:

After Labour lost [in the UK], one exasperated member and activist despaired over how blind the workers were, how easily fooled they were by Tory propaganda. “Don’t they see how evil capitalism is? How brutal and unfair it is?” this activist wrote. “I have many friends with good grades who are stuck working at grocery stores, stocking shelves.” [ . . . ] it is completely rational for someone in that position to think ‘the evils of capitalism’ are somehow laid bare for the world to see when their friends are forced to stock shelves like a common peon in order to pay the rent. That the other workers at the grocery store probably find this way of thinking completely ludicrous and arrogant is obviously besides the point . . .

We should not make fun of an activist who despairs at the state of the world when good, solid, middle class people with solid, middle class grades can no longer achieve the middle class lifestyle they were promised. It is however a basic political truth that a worker’s movement consisting of people who are angry at the prospect of social and economic ‘demotion’ – in other words, people who are fighting against the cruel fate of having to become workers – cannot ever succeed. Promising free broadband, or unlimited Space Communism, or some other stupid fantasy world where getting angry at having to work like a normal person is unacceptable because nobody has to work won’t really change that.

On top of this, the more this class of people who are now tethering on the edge of proletarianization grows, the more parasitical they will become, must become. If the destructive spirit of unfettered capitalism decides that it no longer needs a big middle class, the only actor with the power to save this historically obsolete class is the state. 

Meanwhile in Japan, a hungry man tries to steal restaurant food from a display only to find that it’s made from plastic.

These are handy for tourists. Can’t speak Japanese? Just point!

There’s too much darkness and not enough frivolity on today’s Dark Side so I’ll just say there’s one more story from Japan here which is a bit disturbing.

That’s it.

* Yes that’s Brennus from the 390 BC sack of Rome whereas I was making comparison to Alaric of the 410 AD sack of Rome. I couldn’t find a good picture of him but.


Also available on many other platforms.

30 comments

  1. luisman · January 17

    Reblogged this on Nicht-Linke Blogs.

    Like

  2. luisman · January 17

    The whole Q-thing that Vox day sometimes promotes is just an ARG or LARP, the only difference is that the puppet-master is highly adaptive to the creativity of the community. Sadly most don’t realize that they’re playing, or rather that they are played with.

    The thing that Trump somehow induced at the Capitol, even though the ‘storming’ took place around 20 minutes before he ended his speech, had plenty of negative outcomes. But one good outcome may be, that the radical left has seen, if they go on like this, they may not face 20-30 ‘proud boys’, but 2 million armed to the teeth Americans.

    Like

    • Himself · January 17

      Trump induced nothing at the Capital. News is coming out that it had been planned well in advance, TPTB knew it, we offered troops and declined. It was allowed to happen.

      Again, our top alphabet agencies, and the gubmint in general, let us down again. Why? We have yet to find out.

      Top men on the job. Top. Men.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. dickycone · January 17

    “they could just quit and spend the rest of their lives in obscene luxury. I’ve always wondered why so few rich men do that. Not just ones mobbed by SJWs – I don’t understand why any man with more than $5M or so would spend another stressful day in the office. Something drives them aside from money. If not power, what?”
    Someone (can’t remember who) once said that if two million dollars would be enough for you to never work again, that’s why you’ll never have two million. You have to have a purpose in life. I think for Dorsey, Bezos, etc., as well as lesser oligarchs, amassing ever more money and power is that purpose.
    “As for me, some time ago I requested tech bro advice for this blog. After long consideration, I decided not to move. I’m curious to see if WP would really ban a site as moderate and kind-hearted as this one.”
    Me too. Aside from being reasonable and enjoyable to read, your blog serves as a kind of canary in a coal mine in this sense.
    “The internet now feels like being a teenager in 1994 where you can’t have a private conversation because you have to use the single landline in the living room and your parents sitting there watching Heartbeat will give you a dark look if your language creeps beyond PG13.”
    Aye.
    “Watch me lose some followers: Trump did subtly encourage some of his dumber followers to take extreme action, or at the least he took too long to call them off, hoping vaguely they had a plan. Then when they failed because they assumed he had a plan, Trump threw them under the bus…keep in mind: what did Trump do for Julian Assange, who leaked the Dem emails? What did he do for James Fields, who was railroaded when he probably should have been done for manslaughter? What did Trump do for the gun-waving couple in St. Louis? What did he do for Kyle Rittenhouse? What will he do for you?”
    Aye to this, and your subsequent list of all the things Trump could have done that would have been better. It’s like how there are endless amounts of ideas online for what they could have done with the Star Wars prequels that would have been far better than the actual films. Trump, the Phantom Menace of right-wing nationalist presidents.

    Liked by 1 person

    • overgrownhobbit · January 18

      I only know one person who could critique Mr. Trump from experience: What he could have done, based on his milieu, previous experience, and resources. And he is very, very ill.

      I have yet to find a critique from one such. Most come from people much farther down the food chain.

      Like

      • dickycone · January 18

        You don’t have to be an oligarch to see that we just didn’t get much of what we were promised with Trump. Still, in a way I admire you true believers for your optimism at this point. Just don’t go breaking into any capitols, or if you do don’t expect your guy to have your back. It’s my understanding that prison isn’t much fun for the demographic that makes up most of the president’s supporters.

        Like

        • overgrownhobbit · January 19

          Eh? My husband wanted Trump to destroy the establishment parties (DNC & RNC) and got about 1.5. I wanted him to appoint Constitutional originalists, keep us out of foreign wars, and punch back at our common foe the press. Maybe. Making the newsies have fits seemed doable. Granted that the former turned out to be a stupid wish (that ship has sailed), but the man delivered beyond expectations. I also got the ability to buy insurance across state lines. Bonus!

          I know some people expected Mr. Trump to build a wall (Not me. Though I’d really have liked to have shut down H1B visas and chain migration. But he never promised any of that.) And give the man his due, he tried. The army corps of engineers was a great move, but at the end of the day, there’s not much a Pres. can do. Mr. Trump did promise to drain the swamp, but its depth and breadth…. Who boy. All he managed to do was expose it. But getting the NYT to admit that the deep state was real, and pizza gate, and take out Epstein. Novel.

          I don’t know who was promising you all these dreams of saving White America, but you got sold a bill of goods. I was promised a crony capitalist Democrat slut, and have been nothing but pleasantly surprised by what we got instead.

          Like

          • dickycone · January 19

            “There’s not much a president can do.”

            It’s interesting that pretty much all Trump apologists have to include a caveat like this. I’m glad for you that you’re happy with what we got.

            Like

            • overgrownhobbit · January 21

              How do you get from: “I was pleasantly surprised that Mr. Trump was not actually a Clinton crime syndicate stooge, and/or Literally Hitler” to “I am happy with what we got”. To whit: The Bidenreich.

              Were underpants gnomes involved?

              Joking aside, It does not have to be all or nothing. A man can perceive the good qualities Mr. Trump has, even as he does his failings. I even admitted I am prone to somewhat overestimate the good, since my expectations going in were so low.

              I have never understood the need to either worship or demonise Trump. Just tell the truth and play fair.

              Like

              • dickycone · January 21

                In your original reply, you seemed to be implying that you need to be a multi-billionaire real estate mogul to be worthy of criticizing him. “Most (criticism of Trump) comes from people much farther down the food chain,” you said. That made you come off as an unreasonable sycophant, and insensitive to the people who voted for Trump hoping he’d do much better than he did.

                I agree that he did some good and some bad and that Clinton would have been worse. For what it’s worth, I actually like the Prequels. People “much farther down on the food chain” than George Lucas have just had far better ideas for what they could have been. Don’t kill Darth Maul off in the first film, don’t fill your cabinet with the swamp you say you want to drain. You don’t have to be a multi-billionaire director or president to see these things.

                Like

                • overgrownhobbit · January 22

                  Ah, we misunderstood him. No. I meant that we need to be up in the inner circles of power to know what’s really going on. For example, did you know that the Falklands war hung on shipment of arms to the British Navy diverted from the Israelis? No? Why not? Because you are not privy to that kind of information. Neither am I. But I knew some one, once, who was, for a time (years ago, obviously). If you’re down here in the cheap seats you do not have a clue what kind of wheeling, dealing, & games that are going on. Neither do I, anymore, even second-hand.

                  You don’t know what he could or could not do. All you can see is what he tried to do, on the surface, compared to the scope of a problem that encompassed every state, every bureacracy, the higher levels of the military, most of the courts, state elections officials, state prosecuting attorneys, all the established press, and most of the second-class “right wing press” and… Organizing a small scale battle between two second-rate world powers is peanuts.

                  Trump did okay, for what he was. He did *marvelously* for what we had to choose from. Comparing him to George Washington or Pinochet… or just your own imaginary man on a white horse.. YUGE meh. Comparing him to the Clinton & Bush crime team: better than many of us deserved.

                  Like

                • dickycone · January 22

                  I’ll agree with you on “Better than the Clintons and Bushes,” but that is one low bar. It is what it is. I’ll admit that I miss him already.

                  Liked by 1 person

    • dickycone · January 18

      Also, I apologize for the lack of spacing that makes my original post hard to read. It was there when I posted but didn’t come through for some reason. Nik, have you considered allowing editing for an hour after a post is made like RVF? If that’s even possible with WordPress.

      Like

    • Gunner Q · January 19

      “Someone (can’t remember who) once said that if two million dollars would be enough for you to never work again, that’s why you’ll never have two million. You have to have a purpose in life. I think for Dorsey, Bezos, etc., as well as lesser oligarchs, amassing ever more money and power is that purpose.”

      Basically. Beyond a certain point, being rich becomes a full-time job. You have to follow your investments, manage subsidiaries, set up passive incomes, meet with the bankers… it quickly consumes your life and then your soul.

      The good 1%ers have the self-discipline to pull back from that event horizon.

      Like

  4. Kentucky Headhunter · January 17

    “I’ve always wondered why so few rich men do that. Not just ones mobbed by SJWs – I don’t understand why any man with more than $5M or so would spend another stressful day in the office. Something drives them aside from money. If not power, what?”

    I wonder how stressful it is when you are the boss and already have fat stacks piled up beyond your ability to spend in 10 lifetimes. The company is basically a hobby farm at that point I would think. Or maybe being president of company x is just how you see yourself and you can’t imagine being anything else?

    I think power and control have a lot to do with it. But, Bill Gates’ megalomania forced him to quit his old job at his state-sanctioned monopoly (Boring!) so he could lord it over the entire world from his throne at his foundation.

    Liked by 1 person

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  7. JaXX · January 18

    Gentlemen…and gentlewomen, if there are any here….

    A million dollars ain’t what it used to be.

    For example, the Australian dollar has lost about 85% of its purchasing power against gold since the start of this century.

    So, to have $5M in assets may well be considered “rich”, but it’s not really. Especially considering that due to the mega-bubble in Australian property, even the most disgusting crack shack in Sydney is probably worth a million and a half.

    Lots of people, at least in Australia, are nominally millionaires. But…you do need some sort of a roof over your head and the value of your home contributes nothing to your living expenditure requirements.

    Furthermore, in the current ConVid-1984 world, you need to be a billionaire, and have your own plane, if you want to be able to do anything and go anywhere. The rest of us, even those nominally worth >$5M, are nothing but serfs.

    Yours truly among them.

    Like

    • Nikolai Vladivostok · January 18

      You can retire frugally in the Philippines on half a mil, very comfortably on a mil. 5M and you’d be laughing.
      This is why I will not retire in Australia. I’d be back in a share house bumming cigarettes.

      Like

  8. JaXX · January 18

    Yeah, mate, you can certainly retire in the Philippines for that.

    Assuming the Australian government allows you to leave the country, lol…
    As things stand, some head health Nazi has just stated there won’t be any travelling till the end of 2022 at the earliest.

    But then again, you can probably live quite cheaply in Cunnamulla, too.
    Last time I was there, you could buy a house for ~$80K and considering there’s fuck-all to do, your other expenditures would be limited to food and maybe Netflix – assuming you can get good enough internet.
    And you’ll save the air fares! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hesse Kassel · January 19

      I note that there is an exception to Australia’s international travel ban for anyone who says they are leaving for more than 3 months.

      I have been considering trying that. Can anyone shed a bit of light on how things are day to day over there at the moment?

      Like

      • JaXX · January 19

        Are you in Australia at the moment?

        If so, you would know that the situation differs between the various states.

        The rules regarding leaving the country are set by the Federal government. Yes, you can, apparently, leave if you plan to be away for more than 3 months, or if you have another country’s passport.

        Arriving is a different story. Seats on planes coming in are limited, so thousands of Australians are stuck overseas, unable to get home because the airlines prioritise business class fares.
        On arrival, there are quarantines.

        Masks are compulsory now on domestic flights; some 40 years of peer-reviewed studies, all showing masks don’t work, are ignored.

        The local sheeple, like in Europe or in the USA, by and large are incapable of doing their own research. Consequently they are terrified and clamouring for the government to lock them down some more, and to absolutely never ever let anyone into the country.

        Freedom is now slavery. Fascism is the new religion.
        Welcome to 2021, comrades.

        Like

          • JaXX · January 19

            I know mate.
            I saw that post of yours.
            It is a disgrace.

            And you are right – just have a look at the Whirpool travel forum (whirlpool.net.au) to see the rabid reactions toward anyone who is stuck overseas and either cannot afford the fare back, or the $3K for the quarantine.
            What has happened to this country?

            I am a native-born Queenslander, but I am so disgusted by all this totalitarian BS that I’m biding my time to piss off for good, as soon as I get a chance.
            It is a sad indictment of the West when the likes of Russia are apparently more free than we are.
            We have indeed forgotten what made us what we are. Or, rather, what we were.

            Liked by 1 person

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  10. overgrownhobbit · January 18

    “I’ve always wondered why so few rich men do that.

    How many very rich men do you know? What is the set of rich men from which the ones who go full Gates/Soros on the world are drawn? What are the percentages?

    I can tell you that if the rich man has a god he serves, he will continue to serve it no matter how much money he has. And if he has very little money you will never hear of it. And of course, the nature of the god: Good, vile, foolish, matters too.

    Like

  11. Kentucky Gent · January 22

    The most shocking takeaway from this article is that 2400 years ago a Barbarian named Brennus wore plaid slacks from the 1970s…

    Liked by 1 person

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