Mokita

Book review of The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life (A Free Press Paperbacks Book) by Richard J. Herrnstein and Charles Murray

In the last two years I have read an enormous number of books due to my technological isolation, and many times I have thought, why the hell didn’t I read this when I was twenty?  This is one of those.  It is so prescient, so relevant, and so essential to understanding present-day SJW/Big Tech hysterias that I was embarrassed that I had not read it before, and that, like most others, I had completely misunderstood what it was all about.  If you haven’t read it, you no doubt suffer that same misapprehension.

The Bell Curve is one of the most maligned, unread and misrepresented books of the last century.  The main purpose of this post is to explain what it is really about, and how important it is.

First, of course, we must explain what it is not about.  The Bell Curve contains one section about race and IQ, with some speculation about the causes of observed aggregate differences.  It does this only as the Read More

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We’re firing CJ on Friday!

My company rents out a small apartment building.  I’m the only bloke here at the moment.  As we’re super rich in this country my colleagues and I hire cooks, cleaners and a night guard.

One day a girl announced she didn’t want to hire the night guard anymore because it was too expensive.  She asked what we thought.  I said I reckoned we should keep him just for the sake of giving someone a job.  Sure, he’s not essential, but it costs us so little and it’s all his got.  He looks after his mum.  The pay only just covers the cost of some basic food.  And this is not a city full of free-market opportunities for the enterprising local.  Why bother penny-pinching in such circumstances?  Anyway, he’s also handy for running errands, carrying things and whatever, always pleased as punch to make himself useful.

Charity is one thing, but giving someone a job is quite another.

The other residents didn’t want him there anymore.  One said she’d noticed he was starting to come late and leave early (while still acknowledging that he was as reliable as a Bumfuckistani gets), while the other said she didn’t care.

Thus outvoted, that one that wanted him gone said to me excitedly, “We’re firing CJ on Saturday!”  It was a few days before Christmas.  She had a gleam in her eye.

I had a sick, uncomfortable feeling that I did not Read More

“Hey”

I cannot recall the line of reasoning to it.  Perhaps there was none.  I was in a conference as part of my professional development training and for some reason the fortyish lady delivering the presentation shifted, as fortyish ladies will do at the merest opportunity, into how Girls Are Good and Boys Are Bad.  She didn’t specifically mention puppy-dogs’ tails but we got the idea.

She complained about how boys these days aren’t even taken girls out on dates.  What has this to do with my job, you are wondering?  Absolutely Read More

Aesop

Book review of The Fables of Aesop.

Thousands of years later, these stories still have relevance.

To wit:

The Fox Who Had Lost His Tail

An ugly feminist was unconsciously so disgusted with herself that she tried to convince all the other girls to cut their hair short and dye it blue, get out of shape and get tattoos.  She said it was much more convenient that way and that they would receive much praise for their changes on Instagram.

The other girls said to her, “If you were not so repulsive yourself, you would not thus counsel us.”

The Old Man and Death

Read More

A weird fantasy

I have a fantasy.

It comes when I get sick, and I get sick very often.  The last time, a few days ago, I was spontaneously combusting with fever.  I forced myself to keep the blanket on at least halfway because I knew the night was cold, and my legs were like two tubes full of magma.  So, some trouble sleeping and plenty of time for my diseased brain to obsessively focus on and develop my fantasy.

The fantasy is: I am sick.  There is a girl who loves me.  She wets my brow.  She rubs my shoulders, if I can bear it in my weakened and sensitive state.  She asks, are you okay, Nikki?  You’ll get better.  She kisses me on the cheek then lets me sleep, keeping a wary eye on me in case my condition should worsen.

Sometimes I hold her.  Sometimes I lie apart.  But always I’m next to her, feeling her warmth, taking strength from her lovingkindness.

But there aren’t girlfriends any more.

I had one who brought me over Read More

Mornings polluted

Very early in the morning the city looks how it did ninety years ago.  In the dusky light the cracked concrete and peeled paint are less noticeable.  Recognizably European streets and buildings begin to materialize in the gloaming.  The only sounds are birds and the very occasional car which itself is almost ninety.

What a wonderful place this was!  Such perfect weather.  A town laid out like a work of art.  Every second house is listed by Unesco for its unique and innovative design.  The swaying palms and jacarandas that were planted way back then, now mature.  One can squint and imagine Read More

Critiquing the Critique

Book review of The Culture of Critique: An Evolutionary Analysis of the Jewish Involvement in Twentieth-Century Intellectual and Political Movements by Kevin MacDonald

There are three groups of readers here today.  A third of you just shuddered to see that I’m reviewing this book.  The second third just boned up in anticipation of discovering a new convert to RealThink on the JQ.  And the third third have never heard of the book before and have no idea what the fuss is about.

Hello to all of you.

This is Part III in MacDonald’s trilogy investigating the movements, survival and success of the Jewish people across times and places from an evolutionary point of view.  In Critique, he examines the intellectual role of Jews in the west, especially in the profound cultural changes that have taken place since the 1960s.

To summarize: according to MacDonald, the Jews are Read More